Courses

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Jean Monnet Courses in the Department of Political Science and International Relations of the University of the Peloponnese.

The International Relations of Africa and the European Union

A compulsory module of the Undergraduate Programme (8th semester) at the Department of Political Science and International Relations of the University of Peloponnese.

Relations between the European Union and Sub-Saharan Africa are deep and complex. The EU is by far the African continent’s main trade partner and its main source of development assistance, while several all-encompassing agreements have created a sense of a common space that some commentators have defined as ‘Eurafrica’. In recent years there has been extensive diplomatic activity. A variety of new agreements and ambitious declarations have created a growing sense of an ever closer and more balanced relationship. In particular, trade relations between Europe and Africa are in the process of being reformulated.

The following areas will be covered:

  1. Introduction: The History of EC-Africa Relations
  2. From Bilateral Relationships to “One Europe, One Africa Policy”
  3. New Challenges for Africa: Oil, Terrorism and China
  4. EU Africa policy I: Aid
  5. EU Africa policy II: Trade
  6. EU Africa policy III: Foreign and Security Policy
  7. The Global “Great Game”: The EU, China and the US in Africa
  8. Future Challenges of the Interregional Relationship

The aim of the course is to provide students and NGO staff with a deeper understanding of the complexity of EU-Africa relations. In particular, participants will benefit from better understanding of how different EU institutions cooperate or compete, of how EU political and military identities are formed, of how EU development assistance work, and of how EU’s trade objectives affect global partnerships.

E-class (most documents in Greek): http://eclass.uop.gr/courses/PEDIS171/

The International Relations of East Asia and the European Union

A compulsory module of the Undergraduate Programme (8th semester) at the Department of Political Science and International Relations of the University of Peloponnese.

The EU is China’s biggest trading partner, while China is the EU’s largest source of imports. To reflect the depth and breadth of their Strategic Partnership, the EU and China decided in 2010 to upgrade their bilateral relations on foreign affairs, security matters and global challenges such as climate change, the recovery of the global economy, etc. Annual summits and regular political, trade and economic dialogues are held, including over 50 sectoral dialogues and agreements, ranging from environmental protection to industrial policy, education or culture.

The following areas will be covered:

  1. Post-1985: The History of EU-China Relations
  2. Bitter competition: EU-China Trade
  3. How deep is the “strategic partnership” ?
  4. The Global Aspect: EU-China Relations and the US
  5. Human Rights and EU-China Relations
  6. The Arms Embargo
  7. Future Challenges of the Relationship

The aim of the course is to provide students and NGO staff with a deeper understanding of EU-China relations. In particular, participants will benefit from better understanding of EU trade policy, of the integovermental nature of EU foreign policy decisions , of the complexity of the trilateral EU-China-US relationship, and of how human rights priorities affect EU foreign policy.

E-class (most documents in Greek): http://eclass.uop.gr/courses/PEDIS170/

EU Development Assistance to the Western Balkans

A compulsory module of the Post-graduate Programme (2nd semester) at the Department of Political Science and International Relations of the University of Peloponnese.

In many respects, EU aid efforts to the Balkans were far more complicated than aid to eastern Europe. Indeed, the countries of south-eastern Europe also faced the double challenge of transition to a free market economy and multiparty democracy.But at the same time, in contrast to other countries in transition, much aid was directed for the alleviation of suffering of refugee populations and the reconstruction of war-torn societies. Moreover, as international boundaries have been redesigned and several new countries emerged, much aid was aimed at state-building, for the creation and strengthening of governmental institutions and for preventing renewed carnage between bitterly divided populations. The fact that the Balkans was the poorest part of Europe made the scale of the challenge for the international community even more overwhelming

The following areas will be covered:

  1. The Bitter 1990s: Nationalism and Conflict in the Balkans
  2. The Reluctant Participant: The EU in the Balkans
  3. Bilateral and Multilateral Donors in the Balkans
  4. From humanitarian assistance to development
  5. Political Sensitivities: Democratization Assistance
  6. Aid conditionalities
  7. Case Studies: Bosnia and Kosovo
  8. Future Challenges

The aim of the course is to provide students and NGO staff with a deeper understanding of EU development assistance policies. Focussing on Europe-Aid and ECHO the course
aims to familiarize participants with the priorities, practices but also the
effectiveness of EU aid policy towards Southeast Europe. Much attention will be
paid to the use of political and economic conditionalities, trying to show how aid can be uWebsite (in Greek): sed to promote foreign policy objectives and promote reform.

E-class (most documents in Greek): http://eclass.uop.gr/courses/PEDIS207/

EU Development Assistance and Non-Governmental Organizations

A compulsory seminar of the Post-graduate Programme (2nd semester) at the Department of Political Science and International Relations of the University of Peloponnese.

NGOs have become significant partners of EU international development policy. NGOs are important sub-contractors of Europe-Aid and ECHO. However the research on the relationship, though substantial, is fragmented in detailed case-studies and, as a result, there is very little consensus on the strengths and weaknesses of the partnership. However, there are at the same time various externalities. NGOs create transnational networks that promote the European identity in distant places. The post-graduate seminar will study the significance and the role of European Development NGOs. Professional NGO staff from Greece and abroad will be invited to present their experience and views on cooperating with the Commission and the European Development Fund.

E-class (most documents in Greek): http://eclass.uop.gr/courses/PEDIS209/

EU External Relations and Human Security

A compulsory seminar of the Post-graduate Programme (3rd semester) at the Department of Political Science and International Relations of the University of Peloponnese.

Human security has been defined as “freedom from fear and freedom from want”. The idea of elevating the promotion of human security as a guiding principle of EU external policies has been aired since 2004. Several high-profile EU officials have occasionally argued that human security should be EU’s guiding principle in global affairs. This post-graduate course aims at scrutinizing the EU embrace of human security. First of all, it will examine whether scattered references to the notion of human security signify the emergence of a single, more or less cohesive, European understanding of the concept or whether human security means different things to different EU institutions and officials. Second, and more importantly, the seminar will investigate whether European discourses on human security have meaningfully affected the content and the conduct of EU external policies. The course will assess the impact of EU policies on the human security of other peoples. It will examine the effectiveness of EU external policies, emphasizing the question of coherence among different EU actions.

E-class (most documents in Greek): http://eclass.uop.gr/courses/PEDIS224/

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